A postcard from the early 1900s of the High Street with a bakers cart in the street and Waldock's grocery shop next to the Eyston Arms.

'Up Street’ - Annual Exhibition 2018

 

What was life like growing up in Chapel Square a hundred years ago? And do you know about the King’s Manor fetes, the street processions, the drinking games in the Wheatsheaf, the stable lads in No. 1, Tony Castle’s shop next to the Eyston?

Come along to 'Up Street', the Exhibition of 2018 to find out!

Exhibition opens Sunday 29th April 2018 and every Sunday from 2.30pm - 4.30pm thereafter. 

‘The secret history of your street” project, now in its fifth year, has been an adventure in detective work. We are always uncovering new photographs, paintings, documents and objects. Those of us involved in the project see the annual summer exhibition as a gathering together of the previous year’s most exciting discoveries.

 

Currently we have privileged access to an incredible private archive of  historical postcards dating back to the 1890s. The postcards have been digitally scanned to the highest quality allowing us to share with you unbelievably sharp and detailed images of life in Hendred through the last 130 years.

 

Huge amounts of work is also being done on the oral history of the village and every year we are very proud to be able to show off the fruits of this great project. Combining the oral project with the photographic collection of the Museum adds compelling depth to our exhibitions and we think that this year is no exception.

 

The new 2018 exhibition focuses on Chapel Square and the top end of the High street.  Come and find out where the village pound was (and what it was), the Carthusian monks  and Champs Chapel (the only grade one listed building in the village) and King’s Manor when it was a working farmyard.

 

What was life like as a child growing up in Chapel Square? Remember telegrams and the lady at the telephone exchange on the High Street ‘putting you through’?  And the King’s Manor fetes, the street processions, the drinking games in the Wheatsheaf, the stable lads in No. 1, Tony Castle’s shop next to the Eyston? And what about the rare K3 style white telephone box on the High Street? Bet you don’t remember that, but we can show it to you!